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Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old October 5th 10, 01:19 PM posted to uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Bioboffin[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent

I have a 4 year old Mazda 3 which I am trading in for a new Mazda 3 next
month. I noticed that the old car has blistering on the edge of the 'spokes'
of the alloy wheels on the outside of the wheel. They happen to be aligned
with the disk brakes. My first thought was that they could be caused by the
heating and cooling resulting from heavy braking. I looked on the internet
and there is a lot of stuff there about why blistering might occur, most of
it about chips from road gravel. This does not really explain why it should
only be on the outer edge of the wheel, although, of course they are
travelling at twice the speed of the car. However, I digress.

Does anyone have any suggestion as to how I might prevent this happening on
my new car, which I am planning to keep for ten years or so? I have read
that there is something called 'alloy wheel protection' can anyone be more
explicit about what this is, and whether it is worth doing?

John

p.s. apologies to anyone who has seen this posted elsewhere. I posted it on
uk.rec.cars about a week ago and got no response. Any suggestions will be
welcomed.

J

  #2 (permalink)  
Old October 5th 10, 02:36 PM posted to uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Mrcheerful
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,691
Default Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent

Bioboffin wrote:
I have a 4 year old Mazda 3 which I am trading in for a new Mazda 3
next month. I noticed that the old car has blistering on the edge of
the 'spokes' of the alloy wheels on the outside of the wheel. They
happen to be aligned with the disk brakes. My first thought was that
they could be caused by the heating and cooling resulting from heavy
braking. I looked on the internet and there is a lot of stuff there
about why blistering might occur, most of it about chips from road
gravel. This does not really explain why it should only be on the
outer edge of the wheel, although, of course they are travelling at
twice the speed of the car. However, I digress.
Does anyone have any suggestion as to how I might prevent this
happening on my new car, which I am planning to keep for ten years or
so? I have read that there is something called 'alloy wheel
protection' can anyone be more explicit about what this is, and
whether it is worth doing?
John

p.s. apologies to anyone who has seen this posted elsewhere. I posted
it on uk.rec.cars about a week ago and got no response. Any
suggestions will be welcomed.

J


I understood it was caused by metal dust from the brakes bedding into the
lacquer and then rusting giving an air hole to let moisture get to the
alloy. exacerbated by people using acidic wheel cleaners.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old October 5th 10, 09:34 PM posted to uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Bioboffin[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent


"Mrcheerful" wrote in message
...
Bioboffin wrote:
I have a 4 year old Mazda 3 which I am trading in for a new Mazda 3
next month. I noticed that the old car has blistering on the edge of
the 'spokes' of the alloy wheels on the outside of the wheel. They
happen to be aligned with the disk brakes. My first thought was that
they could be caused by the heating and cooling resulting from heavy
braking. I looked on the internet and there is a lot of stuff there
about why blistering might occur, most of it about chips from road
gravel. This does not really explain why it should only be on the
outer edge of the wheel, although, of course they are travelling at
twice the speed of the car. However, I digress.
Does anyone have any suggestion as to how I might prevent this
happening on my new car, which I am planning to keep for ten years or
so? I have read that there is something called 'alloy wheel
protection' can anyone be more explicit about what this is, and
whether it is worth doing?
John

p.s. apologies to anyone who has seen this posted elsewhere. I posted
it on uk.rec.cars about a week ago and got no response. Any
suggestions will be welcomed.

J


I understood it was caused by metal dust from the brakes bedding into the
lacquer and then rusting giving an air hole to let moisture get to the
alloy. exacerbated by people using acidic wheel cleaners.

I'm sure you're right. Reading between the lines, are you saying there is
nothing that can be done to prevent it on a new car? (apart from not using
acidic wheel cleaners, which I never did).

John

  #4 (permalink)  
Old October 5th 10, 09:51 PM posted to uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Mrcheerful
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,691
Default Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent

Bioboffin wrote:
"Mrcheerful" wrote in message
...
Bioboffin wrote:
I have a 4 year old Mazda 3 which I am trading in for a new Mazda 3
next month. I noticed that the old car has blistering on the edge of
the 'spokes' of the alloy wheels on the outside of the wheel. They
happen to be aligned with the disk brakes. My first thought was that
they could be caused by the heating and cooling resulting from heavy
braking. I looked on the internet and there is a lot of stuff there
about why blistering might occur, most of it about chips from road
gravel. This does not really explain why it should only be on the
outer edge of the wheel, although, of course they are travelling at
twice the speed of the car. However, I digress.
Does anyone have any suggestion as to how I might prevent this
happening on my new car, which I am planning to keep for ten years
or so? I have read that there is something called 'alloy wheel
protection' can anyone be more explicit about what this is, and
whether it is worth doing?
John

p.s. apologies to anyone who has seen this posted elsewhere. I
posted it on uk.rec.cars about a week ago and got no response. Any
suggestions will be welcomed.

J


I understood it was caused by metal dust from the brakes bedding
into the lacquer and then rusting giving an air hole to let moisture
get to the alloy. exacerbated by people using acidic wheel cleaners.

I'm sure you're right. Reading between the lines, are you saying
there is nothing that can be done to prevent it on a new car? (apart
from not using acidic wheel cleaners, which I never did).

John


Regular cleaning should make them last a bit longer, some makes of wheels
seem to last longer than others, ford alloys last better than Toyota ones
for instance, but probably the best bet would just be to get your wheels
re-finished after about 5 years or whenever they start to deteriorate. the
re-finish people put on something much tougher than the cheap finish that
comes new.


  #5 (permalink)  
Old October 5th 10, 11:15 PM posted to uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Duncan Wood[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40
Default Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent

On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 21:51:45 +0100, Mrcheerful
wrote:

Bioboffin wrote:
"Mrcheerful" wrote in message
...
Bioboffin wrote:
I have a 4 year old Mazda 3 which I am trading in for a new Mazda 3
next month. I noticed that the old car has blistering on the edge of
the 'spokes' of the alloy wheels on the outside of the wheel. They
happen to be aligned with the disk brakes. My first thought was that
they could be caused by the heating and cooling resulting from heavy
braking. I looked on the internet and there is a lot of stuff there
about why blistering might occur, most of it about chips from road
gravel. This does not really explain why it should only be on the
outer edge of the wheel, although, of course they are travelling at
twice the speed of the car. However, I digress.
Does anyone have any suggestion as to how I might prevent this
happening on my new car, which I am planning to keep for ten years
or so? I have read that there is something called 'alloy wheel
protection' can anyone be more explicit about what this is, and
whether it is worth doing?
John

p.s. apologies to anyone who has seen this posted elsewhere. I
posted it on uk.rec.cars about a week ago and got no response. Any
suggestions will be welcomed.

J

I understood it was caused by metal dust from the brakes bedding
into the lacquer and then rusting giving an air hole to let moisture
get to the alloy. exacerbated by people using acidic wheel cleaners.

I'm sure you're right. Reading between the lines, are you saying
there is nothing that can be done to prevent it on a new car? (apart
from not using acidic wheel cleaners, which I never did).

John


Regular cleaning should make them last a bit longer, some makes of wheels
seem to last longer than others, ford alloys last better than Toyota ones
for instance, but probably the best bet would just be to get your wheels
re-finished after about 5 years or whenever they start to deteriorate.
the
re-finish people put on something much tougher than the cheap finish that
comes new.



I've always found maintaining a good coat of wax seems to work.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old October 6th 10, 05:05 PM posted to uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Bioboffin[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent


"Duncan Wood" wrote in message
newsp.vj4isdilcet1rb@newsony...
On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 21:51:45 +0100, Mrcheerful
wrote:

Bioboffin wrote:
"Mrcheerful" wrote in message
...
Bioboffin wrote:
I have a 4 year old Mazda 3 which I am trading in for a new Mazda 3
next month. I noticed that the old car has blistering on the edge of
the 'spokes' of the alloy wheels on the outside of the wheel. They
happen to be aligned with the disk brakes. My first thought was that
they could be caused by the heating and cooling resulting from heavy
braking. I looked on the internet and there is a lot of stuff there
about why blistering might occur, most of it about chips from road
gravel. This does not really explain why it should only be on the
outer edge of the wheel, although, of course they are travelling at
twice the speed of the car. However, I digress.
Does anyone have any suggestion as to how I might prevent this
happening on my new car, which I am planning to keep for ten years
or so? I have read that there is something called 'alloy wheel
protection' can anyone be more explicit about what this is, and
whether it is worth doing?
John

p.s. apologies to anyone who has seen this posted elsewhere. I
posted it on uk.rec.cars about a week ago and got no response. Any
suggestions will be welcomed.

J

I understood it was caused by metal dust from the brakes bedding
into the lacquer and then rusting giving an air hole to let moisture
get to the alloy. exacerbated by people using acidic wheel cleaners.
I'm sure you're right. Reading between the lines, are you saying
there is nothing that can be done to prevent it on a new car? (apart
from not using acidic wheel cleaners, which I never did).

John


Regular cleaning should make them last a bit longer, some makes of wheels
seem to last longer than others, ford alloys last better than Toyota ones
for instance, but probably the best bet would just be to get your wheels
re-finished after about 5 years or whenever they start to deteriorate.
the
re-finish people put on something much tougher than the cheap finish that
comes new.



I've always found maintaining a good coat of wax seems to work.


Thanks Mr Cheerful and Duncan. I will pay closer attention to spraying the
alloys with wax in future. (This is something I've never done - just used
Sainsbury's car wash + wax from time to time).

John

  #7 (permalink)  
Old October 6th 10, 09:06 PM posted to uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Douglas Payne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,483
Default Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent

Bioboffin wrote:
I have a 4 year old Mazda 3 which I am trading in for a new Mazda 3 next
month. I noticed that the old car has blistering on the edge of the
'spokes'
of the alloy wheels on the outside of the wheel. They happen to be aligned
with the disk brakes. My first thought was that they could be caused by the
heating and cooling resulting from heavy braking. I looked on the internet
and there is a lot of stuff there about why blistering might occur, most of
it about chips from road gravel. This does not really explain why it should
only be on the outer edge of the wheel, although, of course they are
travelling at twice the speed of the car. However, I digress.

Does anyone have any suggestion as to how I might prevent this happening on
my new car, which I am planning to keep for ten years or so? I have read
that there is something called 'alloy wheel protection' can anyone be more
explicit about what this is, and whether it is worth doing?

John

p.s. apologies to anyone who has seen this posted elsewhere. I posted it
on uk.rec.cars about a week ago and got no response. Any suggestions
will be welcomed.


The finish on my MX-5's wheels started to bubble on the inner part of
the rim after 2 or 3 years, after 4 or 5 years the finish on the outer
face of the spokes and rim was badly oxidised and starting to bubble.

I had the wheels blasted and powder coated in the early parts of this
year. They are shiny now.

Some manufacturers use better quality finishes than others, my
experience is that Mazda's wheel finish (at least from the period my car
is from) isn't up to much.

Not sure there is an easy way to prevent it, but having the wheels
painted/powder coated isn't all that expensive. I paid 45 per wheel.

--
Douglas
  #8 (permalink)  
Old October 7th 10, 05:57 PM posted to uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Bioboffin[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent


"Douglas Payne" wrote in message
...
Bioboffin wrote:
I have a 4 year old Mazda 3 which I am trading in for a new Mazda 3 next
month. I noticed that the old car has blistering on the edge of the
'spokes'
of the alloy wheels on the outside of the wheel. They happen to be
aligned
with the disk brakes. My first thought was that they could be caused by
the
heating and cooling resulting from heavy braking. I looked on the
internet
and there is a lot of stuff there about why blistering might occur, most
of
it about chips from road gravel. This does not really explain why it
should
only be on the outer edge of the wheel, although, of course they are
travelling at twice the speed of the car. However, I digress.

Does anyone have any suggestion as to how I might prevent this happening
on
my new car, which I am planning to keep for ten years or so? I have read
that there is something called 'alloy wheel protection' can anyone be
more
explicit about what this is, and whether it is worth doing?

John

p.s. apologies to anyone who has seen this posted elsewhere. I posted it
on uk.rec.cars about a week ago and got no response. Any suggestions will
be welcomed.


The finish on my MX-5's wheels started to bubble on the inner part of the
rim after 2 or 3 years, after 4 or 5 years the finish on the outer face of
the spokes and rim was badly oxidised and starting to bubble.

I had the wheels blasted and powder coated in the early parts of this
year. They are shiny now.

Some manufacturers use better quality finishes than others, my experience
is that Mazda's wheel finish (at least from the period my car is from)
isn't up to much.

Not sure there is an easy way to prevent it, but having the wheels
painted/powder coated isn't all that expensive. I paid 45 per wheel.

Thanks Douglas. Interesting, isn't it that Mazda has a reputation for
reliability, and yet their alloy wheel finish seems to be inferior to
others. BTW, I should say that my Mazda has been utterly reliable on all
other counts over those four years.

John

  #9 (permalink)  
Old October 9th 10, 12:17 AM posted to uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Douglas Payne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,483
Default Blistering on alloy wheels, how to prevent

On 07/10/2010 17:57, Bioboffin wrote:

"Douglas Payne" wrote in message
...
Bioboffin wrote:
I have a 4 year old Mazda 3 which I am trading in for a new Mazda 3 next
month. I noticed that the old car has blistering on the edge of the
'spokes'
of the alloy wheels on the outside of the wheel. They happen to be
aligned
with the disk brakes. My first thought was that they could be caused
by the
heating and cooling resulting from heavy braking. I looked on the
internet
and there is a lot of stuff there about why blistering might occur,
most of
it about chips from road gravel. This does not really explain why it
should
only be on the outer edge of the wheel, although, of course they are
travelling at twice the speed of the car. However, I digress.

Does anyone have any suggestion as to how I might prevent this
happening on
my new car, which I am planning to keep for ten years or so? I have read
that there is something called 'alloy wheel protection' can anyone be
more
explicit about what this is, and whether it is worth doing?

John

p.s. apologies to anyone who has seen this posted elsewhere. I posted
it on uk.rec.cars about a week ago and got no response. Any
suggestions will be welcomed.


The finish on my MX-5's wheels started to bubble on the inner part of
the rim after 2 or 3 years, after 4 or 5 years the finish on the outer
face of the spokes and rim was badly oxidised and starting to bubble.

I had the wheels blasted and powder coated in the early parts of this
year. They are shiny now.

Some manufacturers use better quality finishes than others, my
experience is that Mazda's wheel finish (at least from the period my
car is from) isn't up to much.

Not sure there is an easy way to prevent it, but having the wheels
painted/powder coated isn't all that expensive. I paid 45 per wheel.

Thanks Douglas. Interesting, isn't it that Mazda has a reputation for
reliability, and yet their alloy wheel finish seems to be inferior to
others. BTW, I should say that my Mazda has been utterly reliable on all
other counts over those four years.


Mine has also been faultless so far. I have a feeling that quality in
some areas dipped a bit in the mid-late 90s for a few years as
facelifted (mk2) MX-5s have a worse reputation for rotting prematurely
than earlier ones.

I don't know for sure but I suspect closer ties to Ford and
penny-pinching during that period are at least partly to blame.

--
Douglas
 




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